Let Me In (Let the Right One In): John Ajvide Lindqvist

If it wasn’t so G-D cold in Sweden, I might just want to live in the Nordic wonderland. Now, as far as Swedish authors go, I’ve only read this guy and Steig Larsson, but man, they’ve been great. I will definitely be reading more of this author’s work.

The Swedish version of the book is called Let the Right One In, and in the U.S., the book is called Let Me In, and yes, they made a movie out of it, but like most movies from books, about half the book is missing. There’s so much more to this book than what I remember in the movie. One factor that was different was that the movie made it clear that “Abby” in the movie, who is “Eli” in the book is a female. In the book, the gender isn’t always clear, which reveals an entire history of where this character came from. The book also goes deeper into the lives of  all the other characters, how they act, why they act how they do, but it still leaves mystery. I left me wanting more. I wanted to find out what happened next.

Continue reading “Let Me In (Let the Right One In): John Ajvide Lindqvist”

Reading instead of reviewing

I’m going to be taking a small hiatus from reviewing books, because unfortunately, I have to read a dry, boring, but necessary book for work. I work in the IT security world, so I have to keep up with the terminology, technology and everything that goes on with it.

I’m slated to take a rather brutal test, the CISSP exam, within the next couple month so I need to hunker down. I like the world of IT security, but it doesn’t mean I enjoy reading 900+ pages of terminology, policy and information about legacy systems. BUT, it has to be done. So I’m doing it.

Which means fun books will be put to the side for now for this beast.

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Wish me luck!

Gratitude: Oliver Sacks

This is a collection of four short stories, or reflections, that Mr. Sacks wrote during the last few years of his life. The book read like a reflection on what really stood out in his life and what was important during those last few months on the earth. The musings he wrote were entertaining, insightful and sometimes humorous. For example, Oliver was a scientist by trade and had a love of the elements, so each year for his birthday, he would reflect on the element number of his age. His last one, 82, was Lead.

He also took an uplifting approach to life after learning that his cancer had returned again in his 80s. He reflected on the good in his life, and the gratitude he felt for the years that he had lived.

Even though I had different expectations for this book, it was still a good read and a great reminder to focus on this important things in life, to not worry about all the little piddly things that happen, and to be grateful for the day to day occurrences in our lives.

I’d recommend this short read as a reminder to seek out gratitude always.

Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts. This does not mean I am finished with life. On the contrary, I feel intensely alive, and I want and hope in the time that remains to deepen my friendships, to say farewell to those I love, to write more, to travel if I have the strength, to achieve new levels of understanding and insight.

Rating: 7.5/10

 

Zer0es: Chuck Wendig

This was my first “hacker” book, although I feel like I should have started these a long time ago considering I work in IT security, and it was also my first book by Chuck Wendig. I’d heard of him and seen his books, but always forgot to look into them, getting distracted with loads of other books to add to my list (it’s probably a real thing – like biblio-ADHD or something). I actually found his blog, started reading it and loved his writing style, so I finally grabbed up his book and read it.

I would describe Chuck’s writing style in this book as quick paced and rough-edged, in a good way. I read it almost like a noir-style novel, where things are happening quickly, and you’re digging your way through the dirt to find out who’s behind the government conspiracy. Continue reading “Zer0es: Chuck Wendig”

Where the Shadows Lie: Michael Ridpath

 

This was a book I picked up on a whim. The hubs had asked me to pick up a book on WWII for him, so I strolled over to the library to do so. Of course, I can’t go into a library to pick something up without strolling through the aisles to see if I can find anything that looks interesting to me. Like wine, I’m a sucker for the labeling, so the cover of this book caught my eye. It’s a frosty, desolate looking cover, which actually reminds me of my childhood in Minnesota, but this is actually a depiction of Iceland, where the novel mostly takes place. (Note: I also didn’t realize this was a series when I picked it up, so I’ll be reviewing the next novels in the series later).  Continue reading “Where the Shadows Lie: Michael Ridpath”